Ebola prevention in Malawi

At the northern tip of the country, and off the shores of lake Malawi, lies Karonga district. One of Malawi’s largest border posts, Songwe border, lies in this district. Every year, thousands of travelers, traders, refugees and migrants trickle into the country through this border. Making it an area prone to health epidemics. In 2018, when Ebola broke out in the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo, the Karonga District Health Office (DHO) was put on alert

Protecting children from violence

I started working as a child protection officer at UNICEF Malawi in February 2019. A massive flood that displaced 87,000 people occurred just after 3 weeks of my arrival. I was deployed to the affected areas in the southern part of Malawi twice after the floods. The first time was immediately after the flood for assessment, and the other for the response from 25th April to 9th May.

On the move: mobile clinic helps malnourished children

The sound of a bell rings out to announce that the school day has just finished at Kathebwe Primary School. It’s a hot, sunny day. Children run outside and start to disperse. Some go home to nearby villages, while others start kicking a ball around on the school field. A third group joins their mothers and younger siblings, who are sitting with a hundred or more flood victims in the shade of a large tree. Since the heavy rains and floods of early March, this school has doubled as an evacuation centre.

UNICEF helps mother and child who escaped Mozambique

Malawi’s border with neighbouring Mozambique has always been fluid. People move freely across the vast land border for trade and marriage. The language spoken in the southern border villages is often a fusion of Sena (spoken by the Sena tribe of southern Malawi) and Portuguese from Mozambique. It is not uncommon to find Malawians in these areas speaking fluent Portuguese and using a Mozambique network on their mobile phones.